Aldous Huxley

“Ending is better than mending. The more stitches, the less riches.” This quotation from Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, which was first published in 1932, nicely captures the attitude of the consumer society depicted in the novel – a society in which people are created in hatcheries, sexual promiscuity is encouraged, and a Prozac-like drug named “soma” is always available to eliminate anxiety and promote happiness. When it was published, Brave New World received highly critical reviews, and it has repeatedly been banned and labelled obscene for the approach to sexuality that some see it as promoting.  Although set in the distant future and uncannily relevant to  many aspects of today’s society, in 1932 it was a response totalitarianism and to the economic depression that was gripping Europe and North America.

From 1937 until his death in 1963, Huxley lived in Los Angeles. He was an outspoken advocate of the use hallucinogens to achieve mystical enlightenment and in that respect influenced the drug culture of the ‘sixties and later.  He died on the same day as C.S. Lewis and John F. Kennedy

An interview with Aldous Huxley 


Conceptions of the Future: Orwell vs. Huxley

                                                                                                                                                         

“Aldous Huxley.” Wikipedia-The Free Enclyclopedia. Wikimedia Foundation Inc. 20 July 2012. Web. 1 Aug 2012.
“Brave New World.” Wikipedia-The Free Enclyclopedia.Wikimedia Foundation Inc. 27 July 2012. Web. 1 Aug 2012.

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